CBR100 – That wasn’t so easy!   Leave a comment

Saturday, 21 March, 2015

Today, after three months of training, I and about 300 other people completed a 56km hike as part of the inaugural Canberra 100 Challenge (CBR100). It was supposed to be 50km, but I think the organisers cocked up on the route somewhere and we all ended up doing around 56km. Mind you it could have been worse, there were a few number of runners and walkers doing a 100km route! It’s the furthest I’m ever hiked (maybe I did more back in my scouting days!), but thanks to all the training and preparation work I felt pretty strong at the end, not that I couldn’t have gone any further!

The day started at 4am when the alarm went off and I dragged my arse out of bed to start the task of preparing myself and equipment for a long day. First up to make porridge with yogurt and honey throw in for good measure, next was to tape my toes and feet up with Fixamol, this stuff is great at preventing blisters and the like. Finally, recheck the contents of my pack and throw in the flapjack pieces I had made earlier in the week (thankyou Carole for the recipe, delicious!), nuts/raisins, Christmas cake, and a couple of tubes of Gu along with two water bottles.

Parked up at the venue without any problems and after rechecking that I had everything, made my way to the start line where I saw off the first wave of participants who were taking on the 100km solo run/walk, bloody idiots. The best of them would take around 9:30 Hours to cover the distance, but most of them were looking at least 20 hours out on the course, with some of them coming in at around the 28 hour mark. Then it was our turn to be sent off and at 06:10 we were off. Of course it was still dark at this time, but the first few kms were along the lake and up ANZAC Parade, which are both well lit.

Then bam! Just behind the War Memorial we hit Mt. Ainslie, the first (and biggest) hill on the course. At the top of this there was a water station and toilet both of which I used. Walking down the other side of the mountain, we could see Mt Majura in the distance, luckily the 50km course didn’t go over the top of this hill, instead taking us around it and on a broad sweep of the northern suburbs of Canberra. In the middle of this 20km stretch was the first of the two Transition Areas we were to pass through today, here the organisers had laid on fresh fruit, hot cross buns (well it is nearly Easter!), jellied snakes as well as the usual water containers and toilets. It was here that we said goodbye the 100km people, who headed north to edge of the ACT for a jaunt around One Tree Hill and Hall.

For most of the time on this section we could see the Telstra Tower in the distance sitting on the top of Black Mountain and it was with a sense of foreboding that we approached the foot of climb after entering the nature park that it sits in. Thankfully, there was a water station located at the top of the climb and most people took the opportunity to take a break here, although mine was a bit longer than expected, as I had to wait ages to use the single porta-loo set up there (Question, why do women take so long in the toilet?). The first part of the descent was a bit tricky as the path down had been closed off for some reason and we were sent down a steep embankment which had obviously been cut up a fair bit with those walker/runners who had got there first.

The next 10km or so were spent walking through the lower slopes of Black Mountain and then onto the National Arboretum (unscheduled break for coffee and flapjacks in the café, cheeky!), before heading down to lake Burley Griffin and a walk around its western loop that I know so well from my many rides around the lake. It was at around this stage that everybody started to realise that something was wrong with the distance we were supposed to be doing, as the GPS tracker on my iPhone was telling that we had already covered 45km and knowing this area so well, I knew that there was at least another 10km to walk over Red Hill and down the other side to the lake and the finish line.

Sure enough the 50km mark was passed near the summit of Red Hill and feeling a bit aggrieved, the final 6km or so felt like a punishment more than the triumphant push for the finishing line that it should have been. To compound my misery, it was getting dark when crossing Commonwealth Bridge (although I did get a great shot of the setting sun over the National Museum of Australia) and to top it all, there was hardly anybody there to witness the crossing of the line. I got the impression that those volunteers who were manning the finishing line overnight were settling in a long haul and everything that had been setup for the majority of people who were doing the 25km course (and had long finished) had been packed away.

Ah well, time for another pee (I don’t think I’ve been to the toilet so much in my life) and a stretch before heading home and nice long shower and bed.

Click here to follow link to see a Strava GSP Track of my 56km hike

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yermandownunder

A Blog about Mario's life down under!

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